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Six Degrees of Separation is written over a night time New York cityscape.

Show Description

Inspired by a true story, John Guare's Six Degrees of Separation follows the trail of a young black con man who insinuates himself into the lives of a wealthy white New York couple. After a shocking surprise, however, their picture of the young man changes, and the couple try to piece together the connections that gave him access to their lives.

John Guare’s Six Degrees of Separation
received the 1991 New York Drama Critics Circle Award for Best Play and the 1993 Laurence Olivier Award for Best New Play. It was a finalist for the 1991 Pulitzer Prize for Drama and received a Tony Award nomination for Best Play.

Reviews

Broadway’s crazy good revival of “Six Degrees of Separation” is proof of theater’s enduring impact. Even if you’ve never seen John Guare’s smart, juicy and still-potent 1990 comedy — or the film version — you probably know the meaning of the title. You’ve likely used it in conversation.Guare didn’t invent the notion of six degrees, but his play, based on true events, popularized it and made it shorthand for how everybody's connected. Or, on the other hand, kept at a distance — by just six other people.

---New York Daily News

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FOUR STARS!
Paul’s really a confused, possibly bisexual petty criminal, and Corey Hawkins endows him with just the right balance of vulnerability and class resentment. Allison Janney is a perfect Ouisa Kittredge: martini-dry and quick with a quip, almost undone by maternal instinct. John Benjamin Hickey flits amusingly about as her art-dealer and husband Flan. The ensemble required by Guare is quite large—15 actors besides the main three—and allows small but bright turns by Lisa Emery, Michael Siberry and the luminous Colby Minifie as Flan and Ouisa’s perplexed daughter

---TimeOut NY

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The production, directed with compassion and merciless hilarity by Trip Cullman, has a wonderful, luxuriously large cast, with some actors dropping in for just a few perfectly pitched scenes.

---Newsday

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