A Doll's House, Part 2

A Doll's House Part 2 is written in gold on old parchment.

Show Details

Performance Schedule

TUESDAY & THURSDAY @ 7 PM
WEDNESDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY @ 8 PM
WEDNESDAY & SATURDAY @ 2 PM
SUNDAY @ 3 PM

Run Dates

March 30, 2017 - January 08, 2018

Upcoming Scheduled Events

No scheduled performances found.

Running Time

1:35 hrs

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Show Description

In the final scene of Ibsen's 1879 ground-breaking masterwork, Nora Helmer makes the shocking decision to leave her husband and children, and begin a life on her own. This climactic event - when Nora slams the door on everything in her life - instantly propelled world drama into the modern age. 

In A Doll’s House, Part 2, many years have passed since Nora’s exit. Now, there’s a knock on that same door. Nora has returned. But why? And what will it mean for those she left behind?

Audience Advisory

Show WILL perform 7/4

Tickets

Standard Tickets

Wheelchair seating and assistive listening devices are always available.

Phone: (212) 239-6200

Scheduled Performances

Sorry, there are no scheduled accommodations for this production at this time. Please check back later.

Theatre Details

Address

John Golden Theatre
252 W 45th St
New York, NY 10036

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Public Transportation

By Subway: 1, 2, 3, 7, S, N, R, W, Q, A, C, E to 42nd St/Times Square.

By Bus: Take the M7, M20, or M104 bus.

Additional Accessibility Details

Wheelchairs: Four ADA compliant viewing locations with companion seating. Transfer optional.

Seating: Orchestra on ground level. Lower lounge, front and rear mezzanine reached only by stairs.

Elevator\Escalator: There are no elevators or escalators at this theatre.

Parking: Valet parking lot: North side of street between Broadway & 8th Ave. Vans enter on 46th St. Valet parking garage: South side of 45th St.(east of Shubert Alley) between Broadway & 8th Ave. No vans.

Curb Ramps: (2.5" lip) SW corner of 45th St. & Broadway; NW corner 45th St. & Broadway.

Entrance: Double doors in series: 1st set (each 28.5") has one pair of automatic doors from 45th St. to Ticket Lobby with push-button control, incline up to 2nd set (each 28", attended by ushers) to Orchestra.

Box Office: Ticket lobby. Counters 43". Accessible pass-through with writing shelf at 32". Assistance available.

Restroom: Womens and Mens: Lower lounge. Down nineteen steps with continuous handrails. Wheelchair accessible restroom off premises. Assistance available.

Water Fountain: Lower lounge, in restrooms.

Telephone: Lower lounge. Coin slot at 54". Cord 29". Volume control. TTY, shelf and electric outlet.

Assisted Listening System: Reservations are not necessary. Drivers license or ID with printed address required as a deposit. Please call: (212) 582-7678 to reserve in advance.

Visual Assistance: Low vision seats available for puchase in person, online, or over the phone.

Folding Armrests: Nine row-end seats with folding armrests.

Reviews (3)

Welcome back, Mrs. Helmer, if that’s the name you still go by. And just what do you have to say for yourself after all these years?

Quite a lot, it turns out, and they are words to hang on. Mr. Hnath’s Broadway debut, which is directed by Sam Gold and features a magnificent Laurie Metcalf leading one of the best casts in town, is audaciously titled “A Doll’s House, Part 2.” Yes, it dares to be a sequel to Henrik Ibsen’s revolutionary 1879 portrait of marriage as a women’s prison.

Read More of the New York Times Review

The frenetic Broadway spring comes to a thrilling conclusion with the lightning-bolt opening of Lucas Hnath’s “A Doll’s House, Part 2,” a new play so endlessly stimulating that it could give audiences fodder for heated conversation until the fall season is in full swing.

The commercial theater, or for that matter the non-commercial theater, does not regularly present us with new plays of ideas — let alone comedies of ideas. Hnath’s play fairly sets your head spinning with its knotty perspectives. Each scene in this whiplash-inducing (in a good way) play flashes forth a new revelation to absorb and process, although it has only four characters — and, yes, they are all essentially holdovers from the 1879 Ibsen play that Hnath is both honoring and interrogating.

Read More of the Broadway News Review

FIVE STARS (out of five)
...Sam Gold’s exemplary direction keeps you hanging on each turn of argument and twist of knife. Everything about the production works. It’s a slam dunk. 

Read More of the TimeOut NY Review